responsive design image

Situation & Market

Non-carbonated bottled water is the fastest growing segment of the U.S. beverage market. This is mostly water we can do without in many cases. An estimated 25% of the bottled water does not originate from wells or sources, but from the municipal Water Supplies. There are over 150 million plastic PET water bottles sold every day, of which only about 25% is recycled. The rest, about 115 million pieces, end up as litter or landfill. PET bottle waste is increasing at an alarming rate: it tripled since 1995. It takes 450 to 1000 years for a plastic PET bottle to fully disintegrate. In comparison: A plastic bag takes 10 to 20 years to decompose, and a tin can takes 50 years to decompose.

responsive design image

Environmental issues & Problems

If they have ended up discarded in the water, most of the PET bottles will float on the surface for years, only slowly breaking down in to smaller fragments. This plastic trash is deadly to marine life. According to the United Nations, over one million seabirds, one hundred thousand mammals are killed every year. The plastic waste is often found in the stomachs of animals like dolphins, sea turtles and others. Some types of plastic begin to break down in the ocean within one year, releasing potentially toxic Biphenyl A (BPA) and other chemicals into the water. It takes from 450 to 1000 years for a plastic bottle to fully disintegrate.

 
responsive design image

Production & Price

It takes about one third of a plastic PET bottles’ content in oil to produce it. And 5 times as much water as it contains! The oil has to be extracted, shipped by tankers, refined, re-transported, and so on… Bottled water is shipped all over the world, from Italy to the U.S, from France to Canada. Nearly a quarter of all bottled water crosses national borders to reach consumers. To transport the water, a weekly equivalent of 37800 trucks is required. And this is just for the U.S. Bottled water is 10000 times more expensive than tap water. And tap water is often just as healthy, or even healthier than bottled water.

responsive design image

Health Issues

The high mineral content of some bottled water makes them unsuitable for feeding babies and young children. Drinking from a plastic water bottle can pose serious health risks to you and your family. Though drinking bottled water directly from a store shelf can potentially expose you to serious health risks, leaving this bottled water in your car or strapped to your bike and exposed to the hot sun will cause even more serious chemical exposure. Ultraviolet rays from the sun or high temperatures will accelerate leaking of the plastic chemicals mentioned above into the water. Adding to this health threat is a toxic substance called dioxin, which is also released into bottled water when it is left in the sun. Dioxin has been strongly linked to the development of breast cancer. responsive design imageHealth-conscious people like to transport filtered water from home to ensure a safe supply on the go. If you're one of these individuals, using a glass or steel bottle instead will bypass the risks associated with carrying filtered water in plastic. One of the biggest scams soda manufacturers have come up with is, "vitamin water". The marketeers for this cleverly disguised "health drink" take advantage of your growing interest in health and try to make you believe it can measure up to the vitamins and minerals in food. It can't even come close. In truth, vitamin water is one of the worst types of bottled water you can drink! Most vitamin waters contain health-harming additives such as high fructose corn syrup, which is a primary cause of obesity and diabetes, and food dyes that can wreak havoc on your physical and emotional health. Don't be fooled. Skip the vitamin water.

responsive design image

The Options

Fresh thinking. Public tap water is healthy, safe and monitored. It is fresh compared to bottled water (that has been stored) in warehouses, trucks and stores. Tap water must be tested by government-certified labs. The same requirements for bottled water companies don't exist. No more plastic PET bottles, no more waste, no more nonsense. Turn PET into TAP.

responsive design image

The Excuses

But I re-use my PET bottles…

Plastic PET bottles cannot be cleaned properly. Bacteria grow easily on its mouth section and the only way to prevent this is by cleaning the bottle with hot soapy water and dry thoroughly between uses. Ever seen anyone doing this? The general narrowness of the mouth makes it difficult to clean the bottle effectively.

But we recycle PET bottles…

In fact only about 25% of the PET bottles manufactured are recycled. It seems like a good idea, but did you know that, unlike glass bottles, plastic bottles cannot easily be recycled into new plastic bottles (bottle2bottle). They are mostly recycled into new non-recyclables like crates, bumpers, tees and so on). This means that to produce a plastic PET bottle, new raw material and resources are required nearly every time. The collection of used plastic bottles is complicated; every country has its own system, many bottles are non-consignment bottles and therefore end up with the general waste, making it more difficult to separate the material.

But the quality of the bottled water is better…

responsive design image In many developed countries, the tap water quality is equally healthy or even better than bottled water. Many of the bottled waters originate not from natural wells, but from municipal water companies. It’s the advertising campaigns and the labelling of the bottles that want to make us believe the quality is superior. In developing countries, the tap water system sometimes is not up to standard. There, the priority should be given to improving the public tap water system. Instead, the bottled water is promoted, adding to the waste and landfill problem and turning drinking water into an exclusive product for the wealthy.


The Products


responsive design image

responsive design image
responsive design image
responsive design image
responsive design image